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Comparative Literature Luncheon: "Affirmations of Blackness: Reading the Black Enlightenment," Surya Parekh, Penn State

When Nov 03, 2014
from 12:15 PM to 01:15 PM
Where 102 Kern
Contact Name
Contact Phone 8148634288
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This event is a part of the Comparative Literature Luncheon lecture series, a weekly, informal lunchtime gathering of students, faculty, and other members of the University community. Each week the event begins at 12:15 p.m. – participants are encouraged to bring lunch; coffee and tea are provided free-of-charge. At 12:30 p.m. there will be a 20-30 minute presentation, by a visitor or a local speaker, on a topic related to any humanities discipline. All students, faculty, colleagues and friends are welcome.

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"Child awareness of subtle probabilities in adult language use: Evidence from Spanish DO pronouns"

When Nov 05, 2014
from 01:30 PM to 02:30 PM
Where 102 Kern
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Originally from Argentina, presenter Pablo E. Requena graduated with an undergraduate degree in Education from the Universidad Nacional de Cordoba. He holds an MA in Hispanic Linguistics from Penn State and is currently completing his final year as a PhD. student in Language Science and Spanish Linguistics at Penn State. Pablo’s research encompasses both first language and second language acquisition and his research has focused on speakers from variety of Spanish dialects, including Chile, Argentina, Mexico, Puerto Rico, and Southern Spain. With support from the College of Liberal Arts and the Center for Global Studies, Pablo has conducted research with Spanish-speaking children and adults in Argentina on how children use pronouns in variable contexts.

Julian Vasquez Heilig to give Lecture

When Nov 05, 2014
from 04:30 PM to 06:00 PM
Where 216 Willard Building
Contact Name
Contact Phone 814-863-4243
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Julian Vasquez Heilig, Professor and Director of the Educational Leadership, California State University at Sacramento will be giving a lecture titled:

Reframing The Refrain: Civil Rights and Education "Reform"

 

Co-sponsored by the African American Studies Department, and the College of Education.

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Study Abroad Information Session

When Nov 05, 2014
from 05:00 PM to 06:00 PM
Where 167 Willard
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Come learn how to make studying abroad a reality for you! Information about the different types of study abroad programs, as well as resources covering international experience opportunities after graduation will be presented.

Black Girl Dangerous

When Nov 05, 2014
from 07:00 PM to 09:00 PM
Where Foster Auditorium, 102 Paterno Library
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A conversation with Mia McKenzie about the intersections of race, queerness, gender, class, and social justice.

 

Mia McKenzie is an award-winning author and a smart, scrappy Philadelphian (now living in the bay area) who studied writing at the University of Pittsburgh. She is a black feminist and a freaking queer, facts that are often reflected in her stories. She also created Black Girl Dangerous, an online blog and multi-faceted forum for creative and political expression.

 

 

Co-sponsored by the African American Studies Department, the Africana Research Center, TRIOTA, the University Libraries, the University Park Allocation Committee (UPAC) –Your Student Activity Fee at Work, and the Women’s Studies Department

Emerging Moral Minds: The Development of Moral Judgments In Early Childhood

When Nov 06, 2014
from 03:30 PM to 05:00 PM
Where Garden Room at the Pasquerilla Spiritual Center
Contact Name
Contact Phone 814-863-5911
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There has been a great deal of interdisciplinary interest in the emergence of morality in early childhood, with various claims made about what develops, and when and how this occurs. In this talk, Dr. Smetana will discuss psychological research from constructivist perspective that examines young children’s developing understanding of morality as distinct from other types of social rules. Several studies looking at children’s developing moral competence during the preschool and early school-age years will be discussed, and various factors found to be associated with these judgments will be considered. This event is part of the Waterbury Lecture Series. If you are unable to attend the live event, we will be Live Tweeting the event. You will be able to ask questions and interact with us on Twitter (@rockethicspsu).

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"School's Out: Polarization, Higher Education, and the Demise of the American Dream"

When Nov 06, 2014
from 04:00 PM to 05:00 PM
Where 101 Thomas Building
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The McCourtney Institute for Democracy's Speaker Series on Media and Deliberation is proud to present Suzanne Mettler, the Clinton Rossiter Professor of American Institutions in the Department of Government at Cornell University. She will be giving a talk titled, "School's Out: Polarization, Higher Education, and the Demise of the American Dream" on Thursday, November 6th at 4pm in 101 Thomas Building on the University Park campus. The talk is based on Mettler's new book, which will be available for sale, Degrees of Inequality: How Higher Education Politics Sabotaged the American Dream. This event is free and open to the public. For more information, please visit the McCourtney Institute for Democracy's website: http://democracyinstitute.la.psu.edu/

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2014 Steven and Janice Brose Distinguished Lecture Series with Judith Giesberg

When Nov 06, 2014
from 07:00 PM to 08:00 PM
Where The Nittany Lion Inn Boardroom, Penn State, University Park
Contact Name
Contact Phone 814-863-0151
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Lecture 1: “Lewd, Wicked, Scandalous:” American Pornography Comes of Age

From 1842 to 1873, American lawmakers passed a series of measures intended to protect youth from the ill effects of pornography, initially in response to similar measures being taken in France and Great Britain. But the unique circumstances of the U.S. Civil War determined that Americans would have a different experience with pornography and anti-pornography than their European counterparts. With easy and expanding access to photographic technologies, accelerated delivery of the mails, and new customs laws that restricted the importation of obscene materials, the U.S. Civil War made possible the triumph of a thriving trade in domestic pornography—and let loose a spirited morality campaign to stamp it out, culminating in the passing of Comstock Laws. This lecture series will explore the trade in pornography that came into its own in the Civil War era and the strong reaction it elicited.

Judith Giesberg is Professor and Director of Graduate Studies in the Department of History at Villanova University. She is the author of four books on the Civil War, Emilie Davis's Civil War: The Diaries of a Free Black Woman in Philadelphia, 1863-1865 (The Penn State University Press, 2014), Keystone State in Crisis: Pennsylvania in the Civil War (Pennsylvania Historical Association, 2013), “Army at Home:” Women and the Civil War on the Northern Home Front (University of North Carolina Press, 2009), and Civil War Sisterhood: The United States Sanitary Commission and Women's Politics in Transition (Northeastern University Press, 2000). Giesberg’s lectures are drawn from her project on pornography and the sexual culture of Union military camps during the Civil War. Admission is free and open to the public.

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Chinelo Okparanta to read as part of the Mary E. Rolling Reading Series

When Nov 06, 2014
from 07:30 PM to 09:00 PM
Where Foster Auditorium, 102 Paterno Library
Contact Name
Contact Phone 865-9126
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Chinelo Okparanta is the author of Happiness, Like Water, a 2013 New York Times Sunday Book Review Editors’ Choice. Okparanta's writing has appeared in GRANTA, The New Yorker, The Kenyon Review, and Tin House, among others. Her story “America” was selected as a notable story for Best American Short Stories 2013.

Seminar with Joy James, Ph.D.

When Nov 07, 2014
from 10:00 AM to 11:00 AM
Where 216 Willard
Contact Name
Contact Phone 814-865-6144
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Joy James, Ph.D., is F.C. Oakley Chair at Williams College where she teaches in the Humanities and Political Science. James is a board member of CONNECT, a Harlem-based nonprofit that works to end domestic and social violence. Her most recent book is "Seeking the Beloved Community".

 

“The Political Function of Black Maternal Captivity and the Sci-Fi Family”

This talk examines historical and contemporary black mothering as a political response to captivity, disenfranchisement, and violence. Working through the lens of writer Octavia Butler, and historical and contemporary legislation dictating family structure and stability, I argue that prevailing social attitudes express sexual-racial animus against the creativity and oppositional politics of black mothering. I view black mothering as a form of political action, an endeavor that occurs within the home and within social movements. The icon or stereotype of the black maternal coexists with the activism of ideologically diverse black mothering, and the utopian and dystopian battles of the "Sci-Fi Family" in which blacks serve as synonym for  aliens.  The black maternal, mothering, embattled family, all have functions that shape the values and politics of the greater democracy.


Please RSVP to Dawn Noren at dmn11@psu.edu by 11/6/14.

FREE AND OPEN TO PUBLIC

Care, Anxiety and Violence in Fieldwork: Feminist methodologies and Ethics

When Nov 07, 2014
from 12:00 PM to 01:30 PM
Where 118 Willard Building
Contact Name
Contact Phone 814-863-4025
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Ingrid L. Nelson is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Geography and in the Environmental Studies Program at the University of Vermont (UVM). She is a feminist political ecologist interested in the practices, discourses and rumors that make forest landscapes in Mozambique. Her recent work examines masculinities, class, and gender dynamics in forest conservation; afforestation “land grabs;” and illegal timber trade contexts in Mozambique. She received her Ph.D. in Geography and a Graduate Certificate in Women’s and Gender Studies at the University of Oregon and recently finished a postdoctoral fellowship at the International Institute of Social Studies in The Hague on a project examining how users of social media platforms participate in on-line and on-the-ground conservation initiatives. Currently, she is finishing up co-editing the book Practicing Feminist Political Ecologies: Moving Beyond the ‘Green Economy’ with Wendy Harcourt for Zed Books and developing a monograph about the role of rumor in making forest landscapes in Mozambique.

Co-sponsored by the Geography Department and the Women's Studies Department.

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2014 Steven and Janice Brose Distinguished Lecture Series with Judith Giesberg

When Nov 07, 2014
from 07:00 PM to 08:00 PM
Where The Nittany Lion Inn, Assemby Room, Penn State, University Park
Contact Name
Contact Phone 814-863-0151
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Lecture 2: “Storming the Enemy’s Entrenchments:” Civil War Courts Martial and the Sexual Culture of the U.S. Army Camp

From 1842 to 1873, American lawmakers passed a series of measures intended to protect youth from the ill effects of pornography, initially in response to similar measures being taken in France and Great Britain. But the unique circumstances of the U.S. Civil War determined that Americans would have a different experience with pornography and anti-pornography than their European counterparts. With easy and expanding access to photographic technologies, accelerated delivery of the mails, and new customs laws that restricted the importation of obscene materials, the U.S. Civil War made possible the triumph of a thriving trade in domestic pornography—and let loose a spirited morality campaign to stamp it out, culminating in the passing of Comstock Laws. This lecture series will explore the trade in pornography that came into its own in the Civil War era and the strong reaction it elicited.

Judith Giesberg is Professor and Director of Graduate Studies in the Department of History at Villanova University. She is the author of four books on the Civil War, Emilie Davis's Civil War: The Diaries of a Free Black Woman in Philadelphia, 1863-1865 (The Penn State University Press, 2014), Keystone State in Crisis: Pennsylvania in the Civil War (Pennsylvania Historical Association, 2013), “Army at Home:” Women and the Civil War on the Northern Home Front (University of North Carolina Press, 2009), and Civil War Sisterhood: The United States Sanitary Commission and Women's Politics in Transition (Northeastern University Press, 2000). Giesberg’s lectures are drawn from her project on pornography and the sexual culture of Union military camps during the Civil War. Admission is free and open to the public.

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2014 Steven and Janice Brose Distinguished Lecture Series with Judith Giesberg

When Nov 08, 2014
from 04:00 PM to 05:00 PM
Where The Nittany Lion Inn Boardroom, Penn State, University Park
Contact Name
Contact Phone 814-863-0151
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Lecture 3: “Time to Kill:” Anthony Comstock and the Obscenity of War

From 1842 to 1873, American lawmakers passed a series of measures intended to protect youth from the ill effects of pornography, initially in response to similar measures being taken in France and Great Britain. But the unique circumstances of the U.S. Civil War determined that Americans would have a different experience with pornography and anti-pornography than their European counterparts. With easy and expanding access to photographic technologies, accelerated delivery of the mails, and new customs laws that restricted the importation of obscene materials, the U.S. Civil War made possible the triumph of a thriving trade in domestic pornography—and let loose a spirited morality campaign to stamp it out, culminating in the passing of Comstock Laws. This lecture series will explore the trade in pornography that came into its own in the Civil War era and the strong reaction it elicited.

Judith Giesberg is Professor and Director of Graduate Studies in the Department of History at Villanova University. She is the author of four books on the Civil War, Emilie Davis's Civil War: The Diaries of a Free Black Woman in Philadelphia, 1863-1865 (The Penn State University Press, 2014), Keystone State in Crisis: Pennsylvania in the Civil War (Pennsylvania Historical Association, 2013), “Army at Home:” Women and the Civil War on the Northern Home Front (University of North Carolina Press, 2009), and Civil War Sisterhood: The United States Sanitary Commission and Women's Politics in Transition (Northeastern University Press, 2000). Giesberg’s lectures are drawn from her project on pornography and the sexual culture of Union military camps during the Civil War. Admission is free and open to the public.

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Arthur Caplan presents "Should we mandate vaccination for your doctor, you and your children?"

When Nov 10, 2014
from 12:00 PM to 01:30 PM
Where Foster Auditorium, 102 Paterno Library, University Park, PA 16802
Contact Name
Contact Phone 814-863-5911
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Should vaccinations be mandated? Should faculty or students ever be compelled to get vaccinations? What about doctors, nurses, health care workers? Or day care workers and airline personnel? Arthur Caplan will argue that all of these individuals should receive mandated vaccinations as they often make sense even though there are important arguments against imposing vaccination mandates. HPV, flu, measles, polio and other examples will be examined to make the case for requiring vaccination for many Americans. Arthur Leonard Caplan Currently the Drs. William F and Virginia Connolly Mitty Professor and founding head of the Division of Bioethics at New York University Langone Medical Center in New York City. Prior to coming to NYU he was the Sidney D. Caplan Professor of Bioethics at the University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine in Philadelphia where he created the Center for Bioethics and the Department of Medical Ethics. Caplan has also taught at the University of Minnesota, where he founded the Center for Biomedical Ethics, the University of Pittsburgh, and Columbia University. For more information on Arthur Caplan, please visit http://rockethics.psu.edu/events.

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Luncheon Series with Lawrence Houston III

When Nov 10, 2014
from 12:00 PM to 01:00 PM
Where 217 Willard
Contact Name
Contact Phone 8148656144
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Lawrence Houston III, Graduate Student, Industrial and Organizational Psychology


"Organizational Entry: A New Perspective on Self-Presentations and the Socialization of Racial Minorities"

A great deal of research has focused on the recruitment and selection of racial minorities, but comparatively little research has examined how status characteristics may impact the socialization of diverse newcomers. This is unfortunate because socialization is one of the key determinants of whether new hires meet performance expectations and remain with the organization. To facilitate successful socialization, newcomers actively enact self-presentational behaviors to share information about (or image of) the self to reduce any uncertainty regarding their competence and personal characteristics when interacting with key socialization agents. In doing so, newcomers are able foster positive relationships with senior coworkers and access task-related knowledge and resources embedded in newcomer-oldtimer interactions. I develop and test a theoretical model outlining how newcomer race and self-presentations interactively influences adjustment-related outcomes through interpersonal and intrapersonal processes. The model identifies contextual factors that may mitigate the interactive effects of newcomer race and self-presentations on newcomer adjustment. Implications of the study and directions for future research will be discussed.


FREE AND OPEN TO PUBLIC

Comparative Literature Luncheon: "Blister you all: The Calibanic Genealogy in Brazil," Pedro Meira Monteiro, Princeton University

When Nov 10, 2014
from 12:15 PM to 01:15 PM
Where 102 Kern
Contact Name
Contact Phone 8148634288
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This event is a part of the Comparative Literature Luncheon lecture series, a weekly, informal lunchtime gathering of students, faculty, and other members of the University community. Each week the event begins at 12:15 p.m. – lunch, coffee and tea are provided free-of-charge. At 12:30 p.m. there will be a 20-30 minute presentation, by a visitor or a local speaker, on a topic related to any humanities discipline. All students, faculty, colleagues and friends are welcome.

More information about this event…

MBA Information Session for Non-Business Majors

When Nov 10, 2014
from 06:00 PM to 07:00 PM
Where C-9 Atherton Hall
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If you are thinking about graduate business education, join Penn State Smeal MBA Admissions Director, Stacey Dorang Peeler, for an information session for non-business majors. During the session, we will discuss why business school might be a good option for you, what you can do with an MBA, when and how to apply, and how to finance the degree.

"Edgar Allan Poe, 1845, and the 'Invention' of American World Literature"

When Nov 12, 2014
from 01:30 PM to 02:30 PM
Where 101 Old Botany
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When Edgar Allan Poe, Cornelius Mathews, and Evert A. Duyckinck write about U.S. American literature in both local and international terms, they do so from within a country that was experiencing its own rampant internationalization and transformation—economically, politically, and militarily—into an imperial power on a global scale. These tensions within the United States at midcentury become the contradictions galvanizing Poe’s, Mathews’s, and Duyckinck’s statements about U.S. American literature, a literature that should, in Mathews’s words, “insist on nationalism and true Americanism” while also leading “a movement, to whose march the whole world will, ere long, be beating joyful time.” American world literature begins as an imperial and expansionist formulation, and the “englobing” that worries Theo D’Haen in the twenty-first century had already begun by the middle of the nineteenth. Presenter Micah Donohue is an ABD doctoral student in the Department of Comparative Literature currently finishing a dissertation that explores the intersections of irony, metaphor, translation, monstrosity, and poetic recombination in the literature of the Americas. His work focuses on literary texts from the nineteenth and twentieth centuries written in English, French, Portuguese, and Spanish. This lecture is a part of the Center for Global Studies Brown Bag Graduate Lecture Series which focuses on interdisciplinary graduate research.

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"Threats to Masculinity and the Sexualization of Well Performing Women"

When Nov 12, 2014
from 03:30 PM to 05:00 PM
Where 118 Willard Building
Contact Name
Contact Phone 814-863-4025
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Theresa Vescio, Associate Professor of Psychology and Women's Studies, Penn State, will be giving a talk titled "Threats to Masculinity and the Sexualization of Well Performing Women".

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Penn State Graduate to Talk About Career Opportunities in the United Nations

When Nov 14, 2014
from 02:30 PM to 04:00 PM
Where 112 Katz Building
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This talk will focus on the composition of the United Nations, its history, and structure as the Headquarters of international diplomacy worldwide. It will also address the current issues faced by the Organization as it thrives to achieve its mission and its role in achieving development and peace. The talk will conclude with an explanation of the hiring process, career opportunities, and the importance of language training within this process. Fulbright Scholar Said Maalouf graduated from The School of International Affairs at Penn State in 2013. Prior to coming to Penn State, Mr. Maalouf had various experiences working in the private and non-profit sectors in both Beirut and Paris. After his graduation, he was hired at the United Nations' Division for Public Administration and Development Management as a Consultant in Public Administration, contributing to the Division's flagship publication "The 2014 UN e-Government Survey". Mr. Maalouf's current post at the UN is Public Information Assistant, working on outreach programs, addressing public inquiries, and promoting the mission and work of the UN to the people it serves. He speaks fluent English, French, Arabic, Spanish, and Portuguese. This lecture is sponsored by the Center for Global Studies and the School of International Affairs.

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