Skip to content. | Skip to navigation

Sections
You are here: Home Events

Events

Theorizing Gender and Islam Conference

When Dec 01, 2014 09:00 AM to
Dec 02, 2014 09:00 PM
Where see below
Contact Name
Contact Phone 814-863-4025
Add event
to calendar
vCal
iCal

December 1:

9:00am-5:00pm, 124 Sparks Building, Papers presented by international speakers

 

7:00pm, Nittany Lion Inn, Alumni Lounge, Panel Discussion with Kecia Ali, Ayesha Chaudhry, Nina Hoel and Amina Wadud

 

December 2:

9:00am-12:00pm, Closed Session

 

2:00pm - 5:00pm, 124 Sparks Building, Paper Presentations

 

7:00pm, Nittany Lion Inn, Alumni Lounge, Dr. Sa’diyya Shaikh, Conference Keynote Speaker and The Harshbarger Lecturer in  Religious Studies in the History Department

 

The Theorizing Gender and Islam conference is free and open to the public, and we anticipate a rich set of discussions.

Please note that seating for the daytime sessions is limited. You are invited to register with Gabeba Baderoon, gxb26@psu.edu, if you plan to attend the daytime sessions.

We welcome broad attendance at the two evening keynote sessions at 7 p.m.

 

___________________________________________________________________________________________

About the Conference

The conference on “Theorizing Gender and Islam” aims to advance feminist theory and methodology about Muslim women’s and men’s experiences, subjectivities and narratives, and to develop a research community between feminist scholars, Religious Studies scholars, Islamic feminists and those from cognate areas. The conference seeks to bring together critical scholars from Women’s Studies, Religious Studies, Legal Studies, Psychology, African Literature and Sociology as well as creative artists in a vivid exchange that will address a new and complex set of realities. We anticipate a set of invigorating debates that engage rich and complex representations and forms of human subjectivity.

The analytical category of “experience” in feminist theory has importantly destabilized universalist claims about knowledge and revealed the gendered subject of knowledge production. Feminist theorists have examined the diversity of experiences of the everyday, as informed by complex and dynamic cultural, religious, and socio-political locations, inscribed as well by race, sex, class and age. Reflecting on this notion of “theorizing experience” from a feminist standpoint, the conference plans to enable fruitful conversations between feminist scholars and scholars of gender and Islam.

The context of the conference on gender and Islam and the everyday is the wealth of debate around ideas of the ordinary and intimate in the Humanities, law, the media, academia, the state, social movements and creative arts. Scholars such as Lauren Berlant and Njabulo Ndebele have written influential work about “intimate” and “ordinary” lives as counter-narratives to metanarratives of resistance and oppression. Feminists in a range of disciplines, such as history, literary studies, sociology and anthropology, have developed sophisticated theoretical tools that have deepened our understanding of the entangled roles of gender, race, sexuality, ethnicity, class and religion in the texture of “ordinary life”.

Building on the epistemological significance of experience, we envision that the conference will enable the theorization of lived Islam in transnational settings. Examining the various ways in which experiences are constituted through the localized and situated politics of gender, race and sexuality, we anticipate rich critical engagements with meaning making in the everyday life of believers as well as with questions of social justice in individual and collective, intimate and social relationships and encounters. We are convinced that insights gleaned from specific contexts such as the US can speak to related theoretical developments in post- colonial and other contexts and vice versa.

The notion of subjectivity in poststructuralist feminist work is conceptualized as fluid and in a constant process of becoming and consequently subjectivity is theorized by feminists as relationally and socially produced through diverse encounters between the self and other. Furthermore, the enactment of different subject positions, complexly entangled within an individual subject, is intrinsically related to available scripts of gendered, racialized and sexual expressions. Reflecting on non-essentialist dynamic configurations of the human subject, we envisage this conference as addressing a number of questions in relation to theorizing subjectivity in studies of gender and Islam. For example, how are multi-layered subjectivities constituted through diverse understandings of Islam? What are the ways in which Islamic discourses inform individual and social expressions of gender and sexuality? And also, in what ways do intimate, interpersonal, social and political performances reflect the elasticity of Muslim subjectivities? The ways in which subjectivity is expressed and performed are also related to relations of power that are played out in contested and intersecting public and private domains.

Co-sponsored by the: Africana Research Center (ARC), The African Studies Program, The Center for Global Studies/School of Languages and Literature, College of the Liberal Arts Research and Graduate Studies Office, The Harshbarger Lecture in Religious Studies in the History Department, The Institute for the Arts and Humanities (IAH), The Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Ally (LGBTA) Student Resource Center, Penn State Society for the Study of Religion, The Rock Ethics Institute, and the Women's Studies Department.

Presenters include:

Rumee Ahmed, Assistant Professor of Islamic Law, University of British Columbia

Kecia Ali, Associate Professor of Religion, Boston University

Gabeba Baderoon, Assistant Professor of Women’s Studies and African Studies, Penn State University

Sarah Bracke, Visiting Assistant Professor of Women's Studies and Sociology of Religion and Women’s Studies in Religion Program Research Associate, Harvard University

Ayesha Chaudhry, Assistant Professor of Islamic Studies and Gender Studies, University of British Columbia

Huma Dar, Lecturer, Asian American and Asian Diaspora Studies, University of California at Berkeley

Nina Hoel, Postdoctoral Fellow of Anthropology, University of KwaZulu-Natal

Jamillah Karim, Independent Scholar

Fatima Seedat, Postdoctoral Fellow, Religious Studies, University of Cape Town

Sa’diyya Shaikh, Associate Professor of Religious Studies, University of Cape Town

Amina Wadud, Professor Emeritus of Islamic Studies, Virginia Commonwealth University

Farah Zeb, Doctoral Candidate, Institute of Arab & Islamic Studies,University of Exeter


More information about this event…

Luncheon Series with Dana Naughton

When Dec 01, 2014
from 12:00 PM to 01:00 PM
Where 217 Willard
Contact Name
Contact Phone 814-865-6144
Add event
to calendar
vCal
iCal

Dana Naughton, Adult Education and Comparative & International Education

 

"Learning Through Adoption: The Intercountry Adoption Experiences of Canadian and Dutch Adopters’ of Children from the United States"

Intercountry adoption (ICA; also known as international adoption) is an international child welfare practice usually understood as the placement of orphaned children from low-resource nations with adoptive parents and families from higher-resource nations. Except when it isn’t.

In this discussion, Dana Naughton, Ph.D., presents a new wrinkle in this contemporary child welfare paradigm. For at least the last twenty-five years, the United States has quietly secured a place as a “sending country” of children available for international adoption. These children, most of whom are placed at birth or shortly thereafter, are primarily Black, bi-racial or minority infants, and they are placed with families in Canada, the Netherlands, the United Kingdom, among other regions across the world.

Canada is the leading receiving nation of U.S. adoptees, and in 2009, Dr. Naughton conducted a study with Canadian and U.S. adoption service providers and agency directors, to understand the sending and receiving forces that facilitate placement of U.S. children with foreign families. In 2012 and 2013 her doctoral research took her to Canada and throughout the Netherlands (the second largest receiving nation of U.S. adoptees) as she met with 20 families formed through U.S.-Canadian or U.S.–Dutch adoptions. Focusing on the adoptive parents’ experiences, this talk examines: how these families’ learned about U.S. adoptions; why they chose to adopt from the U.S.; the learning activities and preparation undertaken for these transracial and/or transnational adoptions; the emergence of open adoption in a traditionally closed adoption model; and how adopting from the U.S. challenged Dutch and Canadian parents’ constructions of family and citizenship.


FREE AND OPEN TO PUBLIC

Seminar with Portia K. Maultsby, Ph.D.

When Dec 05, 2014
from 10:00 AM to 11:00 AM
Where 216 Willard
Contact Name
Contact Phone 8148656144
Add event
to calendar
vCal
iCal

Portia K. Maultsby, Ph.D., Laura Boulton Professor Emerita of Ethnomusicology, Professor Emerita of Folklore and Ethnomusicology, Indiana University

"Is It African American or American: Reframing the Critique of Black Popular Music"

The critique of Black Popular music traditionally has derived from the music's production as a mediated commodity for mass dissemination, which de-emphasizes the role of Black culture in shaping the character and function of this tradition.  Referencing selected genres, my presentation will examine Black music as social process-the lived experience that embodies Black social practices and cultural values.  It also will consider the changes that occur in the marketing and representation of this tradition when it enters the commodity system for mainstream consumption.

Please RSVP to Dawn Noren at dmn11@psu.edu by 12/3/14.

FREE AND OPEN TO PUBLIC

Understanding the University Culture (International Liberal Arts Majors)

When Dec 17, 2014
from 12:15 PM to 01:15 PM
Where 113 Keller
Add event
to calendar
vCal
iCal

How to Succeed at Penn State Workshop Series, Part 4. Come join a pizza party, and reflect on the lesson s learned during the Fall Semester.

"Sexual and Artistic Transgressions: Pedro Almodóvar and Pedro Lemebel’s Fictional Writing and the Hispanic Literary Market"

When Jan 21, 2015
from 01:30 PM to 02:30 PM
Where 101 Old Botany
Add event
to calendar
vCal
iCal

During the second half of the 20th century Spain and Chile have suffered suppressive and suffocating decades under military regimes whose consequences are still latent in society nowadays. As a result of these regimes, many intellectuals who witnessed the disasters of the dictatorship as well as the changes that came with the installation of the Democratic Era have dwelt on retrieving history and memory through art. This talk focuses on two literary works in which the recuperation of memory is problematized from a sexual and social approach: the Spanish film director Pedro Almodóvar’s Patty Diphusa y otros textos (1998) and the Chilean writer and performer Pedro Lemebel’s Tengo miedo torero (2001). These literary works depict two different stories whose main characters, both of them transvestite, deal with the direct repercussions of the sociopolitical systems existing in Spain and Chile during the 80’s. Presenter Ana Cortejoso de Andrés is a doctoral student in the Department of Spanish, Italian and Portuguese. Her dissertation entitled “Born to be a Star: Representing the Writer as a Global Celebrity in Hispanic Contemporary Narrative (1995-2010)” focuses on the fictional representation of the Spanish-language business market and the narrative construction of the writer as a conflicted character who struggles between artistic aspirations and celebrity. This lecture is a part of the Center for Global Studies Brown Bag Graduate Lecture Series which focuses on interdisciplinary graduate research.

More information about this event…

Mary R. Rolling Reading Series presents Cathleen Miller

When Jan 29, 2015
from 07:30 PM to 09:00 PM
Where Foster Auditorium, 102 Paterno Library
Contact Name
Contact Phone 865-9126
Add event
to calendar
vCal
iCal

Cathleen Miller circled the globe to interview the sources for her latest book, Champion of Choice, which was named one of Booklist’s Top Ten Biographies of 2013. Her previous work includes Desert Flower and a memoir about her life in rural Pennsylvania, The Birdhouse Chronicles. A winner of the Society of American Travel Writers gold award, Miller’s travel essays have appeared in The Washington Post, Chicago Tribune, San Francisco Chronicle and Los Angeles Times. She teaches at San José State University.

Harvey Smith to give Lecture

When Feb 06, 2015
from 03:30 PM to 05:00 PM
Where 216 Willard Building
Contact Name
Contact Phone 814-863-4243
Add event
to calendar
vCal
iCal

Harvey Smith, Sr., Author of the Second American Revolution: Closing the Four Basic Gaps of African Americans will be giving a lecture.

Lecture title: TBA

More information about this event…

Kortney Ziegler will give a Lecture

When Feb 10, 2015
from 03:30 PM to 05:00 PM
Where 216 Willard Building
Contact Name
Contact Phone 814-863-4243
Add event
to calendar
vCal
iCal

Kortney Ziegler, Ph.D., writer, filmmaker, producer, artist and activist fighting for social justice in the trans community, will give a lecture.  Lecture title: TBA

His film: "Still Black: A Portrait of Black Transmen" will be shown before his lecture.

Co-sponsored by the Africana Research Center, the African American Studies Department, and the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Ally (LGBTA) Student Resource Center.

More information about this event…

The Nelson Mandela Lecture with Garrey Dennie, Ph.D.

When Feb 24, 2015
from 06:00 PM to 07:30 PM
Where Nittany Lion Inn, Board Room 1
Contact Name
Contact Phone 814-865-6144
Add event
to calendar
vCal
iCal

Garrey Dennie, Ph.D., Associate Professor of History at St. Mary's College of Maryland

"Mandela's Words:  Mightier Than the Sword"

Nelson Mandela’s death has triggered global outpouring of grief and memorials, a testament to his role in the struggle against apartheid.  As a scholar of death, bereavement, and grief in South Africa, and as a former speech writer of Nelson Mandela, my lecture will speak to the intersection of these dual roles.   As a scholar, I will explore how the language of liberation in the 1960s and the 1990s were deeply influenced by the specificities of time and place.  As a Mandela speech writer, I will detail how living in the moment, the speech writers struggled to craft the language that would give momentum to the struggle to defeat apartheid.

 

FREE AND OPEN TO PUBLIC

Elizabeth Kadetsky to read as part of the Mary E. Rolling Reading Series

When Feb 26, 2015
from 07:30 PM to 09:00 PM
Where Foster Auditorium, 102 Paterno Library
Contact Name
Contact Phone 865-9126
Add event
to calendar
vCal
iCal

Elizabeth Kadetsky is the author of a story collection, The Poison that Purifies You; a novella, On the Island at the Center of the Center of the World; and a memoir, First There Is a Mountain. Her short stories have been chosen for a Pushcart Prize, Best New American Voices, and two Best American Short Stories notable citations, and her personal essays have appeared in The New York Times, Santa Monica Review, Antioch Review and elsewhere. She teaches at Penn State.

Wazir Mohamed will give a Lecture

When Mar 05, 2015
from 03:30 PM to 05:00 PM
Where 216 Willard Building
Contact Name
Contact Phone 814-863-4243
Add event
to calendar
vCal
iCal

Wazir Mohamed, Associate Professor of Sociology, Indiana University will give a lecture.  Lecture title: TBA

More information about this event…

Jess Walters-2014/2015 Steven Fisher Writer-in-Residence

When Mar 19, 2015
from 07:00 PM to 09:00 PM
Where Foster Auditorium, 102 Paterno Library
Contact Name
Contact Phone 865-9126
Add event
to calendar
vCal
iCal

Jess Walter is the author of eight books, including the #1 New York Times bestseller Beautiful Ruins. He was a finalist for the 2006 National Book Award and won the 2005 Edgar Allan Poe Award. His short fiction has appeared in Best American Short Stories, Harper’s, Esquire, McSweeney's and many other publications.

Mary E. Rolling Reading Series presents Robin Becker and Geffrey Davis

When Apr 03, 2015
from 07:30 PM to 09:00 PM
Where Foster Auditorium, 102 Paterno Library
Contact Name
Contact Phone 865-9126
Add event
to calendar
vCal
iCal

Liberal Arts Research Professor of English and Women's Studies at Penn State, Robin Becker has received fellowships in poetry from the Bunting Institute at Harvard, The Massachusetts Cultural Council and the National Endowment for the Arts. In 2014, The Pitt Poetry Series published her seventh collection, Tiger Heron. Becker writes a column on the national poetry scene, "Field Notes," for The Women's Review of Books, where she serves as Contributing and Poetry Editor. Geffrey Davis is the author of Revising the Storm, winner of the 2013 A. Poulin, Jr. Poetry Prize. Other awards include the Anne Halley Poetry Prize, the Dogwood Prize in Poetry, the Wabash Prize for Poetry, the Leonard Steinberg Memorial/Academy of American Poets Prize, and fellowships from the Cave Canem Foundation and Penn State's Institute for the Arts and Humanities. He teaches in the MFA programs for creative writing and translation at the University of Arkansas.

First Book Festival

When Apr 04, 2015
from 07:30 PM to 09:00 PM
Where Foster Auditorium, 102 Paterno Library and Mann Assembly Room, Paterno Library
Contact Name
Contact Phone 865-9126
Add event
to calendar
vCal
iCal

A full day of community workshops and readings by recent Penn State MFA graduates: Sarah Blake, Katie Bode-Lang, Rachel Mennies, and William Woolfit, followed by a gala open reading.

Keisha Blain, Ph.D., Public Lecture

When Apr 08, 2015
from 12:00 PM to 01:00 PM
Where 216 Willard
Contact Name
Contact Phone 8148656144
Add event
to calendar
vCal
iCal

Keisha Blain, Ph.D., ARC Post-Doctoral Fellow for African American Studies

"'[F]or the Rights of Dark People in Every Part of the World':  Pearl Sherrod, Black Internationalist Feminism, and Afro-Asian Politics in Depression-Era Detroit"

This talk explores the political ideas and activism of Pearl Sherrod, an African American woman who became a leader of the Development of Our Own (TDOO), a Detroit-based antiracist political movement that sought to unite African American and Asian activists during the Great Depression. Drawing on archival material, historical newspapers, and government records, I demonstrate how Sherrod articulated what literary scholar Cheryl Higashida refers to as “black internationalist feminism” in her study on black women writers on the Communist Left. As black internationalist feminists, women in the Communist Party—Louise Thompson Patterson, Esther Cooper Jackson, Maude White Katz and Claudia Jones, among them—linked their commitment to universal black liberation, decolonization, and economic justice with a desire to challenge patriarchy and expand women’s rights and opportunities. In this talk, I employ the term similarly—not as a Marxist analysis of racism or explicit challenge to heterosexism but, rather as a way to describe Pearl Sherrod’s dual commitment to building transnational and transracial political alliances while advancing a feminist agenda. By excavating Sherrod’s life, which has been hidden in the historical record, this talk highlights the key role a nonstate female actor played in shaping black internationalist movements and discourses during a global economic crisis and within a climate of government repression and censorship. While much of the literature on black internationalism privileges the political activities of the black middle-class and elite, this talk foregrounds the political ideas and praxis of a working-class woman activist in Detroit who skillfully employed a myriad of strategies and tactics to promote black internationalist politics and Afro-Asian solidarity.

 

FREE AND OPEN TO PUBLIC

Personal tools
Log in